Elementor #174

Elementor #174

1a 1a Cheese Press Cheese Press 2aa 2aa 1937Pencil 1937Pencil 4a 4a Music Conductor's Baton Music Conductor’s Baton 5a 5a Shuttles Shuttles 6b 6b Silver medal Silver medal 8a 8a Castlehill School, Cupar Castlehill School, Cupar 9b 9b 10a 10a 11bb 11bb 12b 12b

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  • Gallery Item

1937Pencil
Silver medal

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Shuttles

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Shuttles

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Bowler Hat

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Front Title

Back Title

Scott’ s Porrige Oats

Back Title

Porridge in a Tin

A&R Scott started their business in Glasgow about 1880 making oatcakes, oat biscuits and Midlothian Oat Flour. Given their Glasgow base that was perhaps a bit cheeky, but they gave substance to the Midlothian connection in 1909 by moving to Colinton Mill. In 1914 the company started to market Scott’s Porage Oats, branded with a kilted shot-putter. It was their most identifiable product, and with the spelling of ‘porage’ registered as a trademark, the company ensured distinctiveness. In 1947 they took over Uthrogle Mill, an abandoned wartime flax mill just west of Cupar and this became their sole base early in the 1970s when they left Colinton. In subsequent years a series of company takeovers by Cerebos, Rank Hovis McDougal, Quaker Oats and Pepsico meant that the small Glasgow baker of the 1880s had become part of a multinational corporation. Importantly the Scott’s name is retained, as is the kilted highlander, still the brand image of what must be one of Cupar’s most recognisable exports.

Our tin of porridge oats (yes it is still full) is not particularly old, perhaps dating from the 1970s, but it is unusual in that label is printed in both English and French.